Must Reads

February 2018 Issue

Mark Rosenfeld’s Secrets for Successful Love Matches

BY ALISON JAMES Australian author, speaker and dating coach Mark Rosenfeld knows firsthand the challenges of navigating romantic relationships. After struggling with shyness, he took on a confidence-boosting job as an exotic dancer in 2011, working with men at both ends of the assertiveness spectrum. In this milieu, he gained a better understanding of men’s thoughts and actions related to ... Read More »

Self-Love

BY CHARLIE CHAPLIN As I began to love myself, I found that anguish and emotional suffering are only warning signs that I was living against my own truth. Today, I know, this is AUTHENTICITY. As I began to love myself, I understood how much it can offend somebody as I try to force my desires on this person, even though ... Read More »

Chocolate and Olive Oil Help Heart Health

Combination Lowers Cholesterol and Blood Pressure Cardiologist Rossella Di Stefano, with the University of Pisa, in Italy, led a study of 26 people and determined that eating a combination of dark chocolate and olive oil improved cholesterol levels and blood pressure after 28 days. She says, “Fruits and vegetables exert their protective effects through plant polyphenols found in cocoa, olive ... Read More »

Moderate Exercise Guards Against Depression

In Exercise and the Prevention of Depression, a study of 33,908 adults in Norway by the University of New South Wales, researchers found that one hour of exercise a week reduced depression in 12 percent of the subjects. The purpose of the study was to address whether exercise protects against new-onset depression and anxiety and if so, the intensity and ... Read More »

Rising Above Adversity

How to Strengthen Your Resilience Muscle BY APRIL THOMPSON At one time or another, an estimated 70 percent of people experience a life-altering traumatic event, and most grow stronger from surviving it, according to decades of research by leading institutions like Harvard and Yale universities and the University of Pennsylvania. We can prepare now for life’s inevitable hurdles and setbacks ... Read More »

Talking to Ourselves Helps

Third-Person Self-Talk Aids in Emotional Control As reported in Scientific Reports, two studies of 37 and 52 people at Michigan State University have discovered that talking to ourselves in the third person using statements like, “Why is John upset?” instead of, “Why am I upset?” can help improve our ability to control our emotions. Everyone occasionally engages in internal monologue, ... Read More »

Mindfulness Reduces Alcohol Cravings

In a randomized, double-blind experiment published in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, University College London researchers found that among 68 heavy drinkers, just 11 minutes of recorded mindfulness training reduced drinking. Subjects were closely matched with an active control group that was taught relaxation techniques. Seven days later, the mindfulness group on average drank 9.3 fewer units of alcohol, roughly ... Read More »

Industry Revs Up for Electric Car Future

China, the world’s largest car market, is planning to stop production and sales of traditional energy vehicles in favor of electric vehicles (EV), and the decision has sped up competitive development by U.S. automakers. General Motors is promising to launch at least 20 new electric vehicles in the next six years. “General Motors believes the future is all-electric,” says Mark ... Read More »

Monsanto Still Gaming the System

Monsanto, the company that makes the controversial weed killer Roundup, is setting farmer against farmer and state against state with its newest product, dicamba. Amid claims and counterclaims over effectiveness and safety of crops and humans, the debate is shedding new light on how new agricultural products are introduced, tested and regulated. One major difference with dicamba is the gaseous ... Read More »

Antidepressants in Pregnancy Linked to Autism

Astudy by the University of Bristol, England, of 254,610 young people from Stockholm showed that children born to mothers taking antidepressants during pregnancy had more than a 4 percent risk of autism, compared to less than a 3 percent risk in children born to mothers with psychiatric conditions not on antidepressants. Depression is common in women of childbearing age, with ... Read More »