Must Reads

Health

Antioxidant Supplements Improve Eye Health

Eye health may be improved by taking certain antioxidant supplements, according to researchers at Austria’s Medical University of Vienna. They studied 40 healthy volunteers between the ages of 18 and 30 split into two groups, giving a control group a placebo pill and the other a supplement containing vitamins C and E, lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, copper, selenium, gingko biloba, flavonoids, ... Read More »

Cleaner Air- New EPA Rules Proposed for Climate Change

The White House plans to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030. Each state will have its own goal within the overall national pollution reduction effort, an attempt to be politically and practically flexible in its implementation. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy explains, “Each state’s goal is tailored to its own circumstances, and states ... Read More »

U.S. Farmers Plant More GMO Crops

Farmers in the U.S. added 12 million more acres of genetically modified (GM or GMO) crops in 2013, reports Clive James, with the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications, and now lead the world in their production by volume. Even as many U.S. consumers reject foods containing GM ingredients, many farmers continue to embrace the technology. “In general, ... Read More »

Shampoo Makers Agree Not to Use Cancer-Causing Chemical

This year, the Center for Environmental Health (CEH) reached legal agreements with 26 major companies to discontinue using a cancer-causing chemical in shampoo and personal care products, and potential agreements with more than 100 additional companies are still pending. Cocamide diethanolamine (DEA), a synthetic chemical created from a chemical reaction between coconut oils and diethanolamine, has been used for decades ... Read More »

Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown is Poisoning California Kelp

Scientists analyzing kelp off the coast of San Diego have linked the presence of the radioactive isotope cesium to the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, in Japan, which melted down in 2011. As part of the ongoing Kelp Watch 2014 project, government and academic institutions have begun receiving results from samples of bull kelp and giant kelp collected along the California ... Read More »

Vitamin D3 Cuts Antibiotic Use by Elderly

Research from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, in Australia, has found supplemental vitamin D3 reduces the incidence of infection among seniors. More than 600 subjects, ages 60 to 84, were divided into three groups and for one year took either 1,000 international units (IU) a day of vitamin D3, 2,000 IU a day of vitamin D3, or a placebo. ... Read More »

Raisins Lower Blood Pressure and Diabetes Risk

Researchers from the University of Kentucky have determined that snacking on raisins can decrease high blood pressure and reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes. For 12 weeks, 46 men and women snacked on either processed snack foods or raisins. At the beginning and end of each month, the researchers tested for blood glucose, diabetic risk markers and blood pressure. ... Read More »

Licorice Root Reduces Dangerous Fat

A new study published in the journal Nutrafoods has confirmed that licorice extract helps reduce visceral fat in obese adults. The study tested 60 men and 60 women that were clinically obese with body mass index (BMI) scores of over 30. For three months, they were given either a placebo pill or 300 milligrams per day of licorice root extract. Then they were ... Read More »

Apple Corps- Green Apple Day Aims to Transform Schools

The Green Apple Day of Service, to take place on September 27 nationwide, will give parents, teachers, students, companies and local organizations ways to transform schools into more healthy, safe and productive learning environments via local service projects. Green Apple is a global movement dedicated to enabling schools to provide clean and healthy air, conserve energy and other resources and ... Read More »

Pre-K Education Linked to Better Health 26 Years Later

In addition to an increased likelihood of achieving academic success, children that participate in game-based educational training also have a significantly lower risk of developing future cardiovascular disease, according to University of North Carolina researchers in a paper published this year in Science magazine. Launched in the 1970s, the Carolina Abecedarian Project studied more than 100 children beginning when they were just ... Read More »