Must Reads

May 2018 Issue

Functional Medicine Seeks the Root of Common Symptoms

Patients’ health problems are too often overlooked by conventional testing methods that ignore common symptoms, says Jennifer Clemente, a clinically trained, board-certified nutritionist who specializes in a whole-body approach to health and wellness. Bloating, fatigue, skin conditions, digestive issues, weight gain or loss, brain fog, mood swings, sleep disturbance, pain, sugar imbalances and hormonal issues are among the many symptoms ... Read More »

Kelly Noonan-Gores on How We Shape Our Health

After Los Angeles native Kelly Noonan-Gores spent 20 years in front of the camera as an actress, she turned her talents to producing award-winning films like Tooken, Beneath and Take a Seat. She considers her latest, the documentary HEAL, to be her ultimate achievement. “I included as many inspiring stories of healing change as possible to expand viewers’ beliefs in ... Read More »

All That Glitters

Sparkly Microbeads Face Ban Scientists have called for glitter to be prohibited due to the threat it poses to wildlife. The glistening, decorative, plastic microbead powder may seem harmless, but environmental researchers report it’s a dangerous pollutant, particularly in oceans. Trisia Farrelly, Ph.D., of New Zealand’s Massey University, notes, “Their diminutive size and sparkling appearance make them appealing to animals, ... Read More »

Helping Hands

Recycled Plastic Transforms into Prosthetics The emerging technology of three-dimensional (3-D) printing can benefit the world in many ways. Re:Purpose for Good, in Australia, creates robotically 3-D printed prosthetic devices from recycled plastic and e-waste. It’s difficult to customize prosthetics, so more invasive surgery is often needed to make standard sizes fit the patient. Other companies produce 3-D printed  prosthetic ... Read More »

Waterborne Drugs

Meds in Urban Streams Drive Microbial Resistance Anew study published in the journal Ecosphereconfirms that in urban streams, persistent pharmaceutical pollution can cause aquatic microbial communities to become resistant to drugs. Researchers evaluated the presence of pharmaceuticals, including painkillers, stimulants, antihistamines and antibiotics, in four streams in Baltimore, Maryland. Then they measured the microbial response to drug exposure. Selected study ... Read More »

5 Reasons to Love a Cat

They Bring Health and Happiness Home As beloved and compatible pets, indoor cats provide emotional, mental and physical benefits. Companionship Loneliness is never a problem with a cat around. “Cats need to be fed, have litter changed and be brushed,” says Lisa Bahar, a therapist and clinical counselor at Lisa Bahar Marriage and Family Therapy, in Newport Beach, California. “Being ... Read More »

Yoga Soothes the Blues

Lowers Symptoms of Depression Taking a 90-minute hatha yoga class twice a week for eight weeks steadily lowered symptoms of depression in all 20 men and women with mild to moderate forms of clinical depression that participated in a recent University of California, San Francisco, study. Another 18 depressed adults attending an attention control class for the same period of ... Read More »

New Guidelines Lower the Bar for Risky Blood Pressure

Nearly Half of U.S. Adults Now Have High Numbers New guidelines that change the criteria for healthy blood pressure mean that nearly half of U.S. adults are now considered to have high blood pressure. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have redefined the condition as being 130/80 instead of 140/90, a change considered by critics as ... Read More »

Acetaminophen Linked to Delayed Language Skills

Pain Reliever Impacts Child’s Development Girls born to 754 Swedish mothers that used acetaminophen during pregnancy showed less ability in acquiring early language skills at 30 months of age, report Mount Sinai Health System study researchers. If the mothers took acetaminophen more than six times in early pregnancy, their daughters (but not their sons) were nearly six times more likely to ... Read More »

U.S. Midlife Women Choosing Natural Health Care

Using Complementary and Alternative Approaches In a survey of 171 midlife American women, more than 80 percent reported using complementary and alternative medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers discovered. The most common choice was herbal teas, followed by women’s vitamins, flaxseed, glucosamine and soy supplements. Only 34 percent of the non-Hispanic white women and 14 percent of the Hispanic ... Read More »